Cialis Decreases Antioxidant Capacity

Cialis (tadalafil) is a popular erection-promoting drug that many men take daily to improve sexual performance and treat prostate enlargement. The drug has been around since 2001, and rakes in more than $5 billion a year in sales. The drug appears safe, with less than three percent of users experiencing headache, upset stomach, back pain, diarrhea, muscle pain and dizziness. However, there might be long-term side effects. Italian researchers found that Cialis decreased antioxidant capacity and made people more susceptible to oxidative stress during exercise. Reactive oxygen species (free radicals) are generated during normal metabolism. These chemicals are highly reactive and can damage cell membranes and DNA, impair the immune system and contribute to muscle soreness. Antioxidants neutralize reactive oxygen species and prevent cell damage. Chronic use of Cialis could make the body more susceptible to oxidative damage. Possible problems might include heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer. At this time, there is no convincing evidence of a cause-and-effect relationship between Cialis, heart disease, and cancer. (European Journal of Applied Physiology, 115: 531-539, 2015)

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