Omega–3 Fatty Acids Do What?

Omega–3 Fatty Acids Do What?
Omega-3 fatty acids are essential unsaturated fatty acids that must be consumed in the diet because they cannot be synthesized by the human body. Two important omega–3s are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Millions of people around the world take omega-3s because they are thought to prevent heart disease and reduce inflammation. Russell Greenfield, from the University of North Carolina Medical School, commented on disturbing results from The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (American Journal Epidemiology, 173:1429, 2011), which showed that higher blood levels of DHA increased the risk of prostate cancer and that higher blood levels of trans fats decreased the risk of the disease. This was a large, well-controlled study involving nearly 20,000 cases and the results are unexpected and troubling. It shows the risks of jumping on popular nutrition bandwagons. What should you do? Dr. Greenfield recommended that people taking omega-3 supplements should buy those with higher amounts of EPA and lower amounts of DHA. (Alternative Medicine Alert)

©2017 Advanced Research Media. Long Island Web Design